Gaye Mack’s Blog

DR. BACH’S AGRIMONY & CERATO-TOOLS FOR ACCESSING YOUR INNER PEACE & WISDOM DURING THIS SAGITTARIUS FULL MOON

Posted on by Gaye Mack in Balance, Karmic and Self-Discovery Astrology, Worth the Read, Writer's Work Leave a comment

Like the rabbit from Alice in Wonderland, once again, I’m late! I’d hoped to get a new post up immediately upon returning from the May session of Steven Forrest’s evolutionary astrology apprenticeship program earlier this week out in San Diego, but alas…. in my effort to be consistent with posts… in true Gemini fashion, I’m not. Originally, on the heels of a conversation with one of my apprenticeship colleagues and friends, I’d planned to post on Dr. Bach’s Scleranthus and its relationship to the very busy planetary activity that’s taking place. However, the current full moon in Sagittarius has deemed otherwise as its energy it seems, is making an intense impact everywhere from postings read on Facebook and Twitter, combined with the exact hit of the Pluto/Uranus square on May 20th. This said, I’ve decided to re-post earlier comments pertinent to this full moon! Call on Bach’s Agrimony and Cerato to help you find peace and reason in the energy of these shifts, internally and externally; you’ll be amazed.

Just when we thought we’d survived the solar eclipse in Taurus on May 9-10th, ready or not, May 24th-25th (depending on where you live) arrives with a lunar eclipse in Sagittarius. Such is the nature of eclipses, they always come in pairs, making sure that we have enough ‘opportunity’ to reflect and adjust! The message of the Solar eclipse in Taurus was for us to focus on jettisoning attitudes, beliefs and ways of being that no longer serve us well, a theme that’s been repetitive for some time now. Currently it’s exacerbated by the on-going tightening square between Pluto (in Capricorn) and Uranus (in Aries) which will make the third of seven exact ‘hits’ on May 20th.

With the Sagittarius/Gemini lunar pairing, we’re further encouraged to integrate heart and head, faith with logic and intuition with thinking in order to manifest our intended purpose in this lifetime…a pretty tall order. Fortunately, we can call upon Dr. Bach’s Agrimony and Cerato remedies to support us in this quest. Sagittarius, ruled by Jupiter…the planet that operates on faith, can easily become restless. This is especially true when Sag is faced with its core mission, the quest to discover the meaning of life. Ironically such an undertaking requires a ‘sense of peace’ in order for the archer to keep true to the mission. Bach’s Agrimony is often paired astrologically with Sagittarius for many reasons. In this instance, his own words describing Agrimony as the remedy that brings “the peace that passeth understanding,” leaves no doubt as to what is called for.

Operating on intuition, the Moon doesn’t think and in Sagittarius, intuition and faith are mutually supportive. We don’t need to understand. Additionally, this lunar eclipse comes with other factors that intensify, for lack of a better word, this message. Mercury, the planet of thinking (and ruler of Gemini) is in Gemini during this eclipse and conjuncts (sits next to!) Venus. Shortly thereafter they’re both joined by…Jupiter. Clearly the universe wants us to get the message that more information input does not guarantee knowledge.

As Agrimony is often paired with Sagittarius, Dr. Bach’s remedy Cerato is paired with Gemini. Classically, the ‘Cerato negative state is described as manifesting in someone who’s very verbal, needing constant input from others or approval when in fact, they’re meant to trust their own ‘wisdom.’ With the message of this eclipse emphasizing heart and head working together, Cerato frankly helps us to shut up, go inside where we can work on learning this lesson!

Finally, there’s one more small detail into this mix…Neptune, that nebulous planet of other-directed awareness. With this lunar eclipse, Neptune is in a tight ‘T-Square’ to the Sagittarius Full Moon and Gemini Sun. Squares are turning points…which way are we going to go? Are we going to remain stagnant in the same patterns or are we willing to make changes offered to us for our evolutional growth? Neptune in its square to the luminaries is just making certain we get its message: there’s more out there beyond the boundaries of our consciousness and the time is now to embrace it. There’s no escaping, this will have been quite the month for progress along our evolutionary path!

DR. BACH’S AGRIMONY
Agrimony-300x295

AND CERATO
Cerato
Photography©Dr. Edward Bach Foundation

A personal note: Coming Soon! My completely redesigned, reconstituted website~all visits welcomed-stay tuned for launch date.

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DR. BACH’S AGRIMONY & CERATO-REMEDIES FOR MAY’S LUNAR ECLIPSE IN SAGITTARIUS

Posted on by Gaye Mack in Balance, Karmic and Self-Discovery Astrology, Writer's Work Leave a comment

Just when we thought we’d survived the solar eclipse in Taurus on May 9-10th, ready or not, May 24th-25th (depending on where you live) arrives with a lunar eclipse in Sagittarius.  Such is the nature of eclipses, they always come in pairs, making sure that we have enough ‘opportunity’ to reflect and adjust!  The message of the Solar eclipse in Taurus  was for us to focus on jettisoning attitudes, beliefs and ways of being that no longer serve us well, a theme that’s been repetitive for some time now.  Currently it’s exacerbated by the on-going tightening square between Pluto (in Capricorn) and Uranus (in Aries) which will make the third of seven exact ‘hits’ on May 20th

 With the Sagittarius/Gemini lunar pairing, we’re further encouraged to integrate heart and head, faith with logic and intuition with thinking in order to manifest our intended purpose in this lifetime…a pretty tall order.  Fortunately, we can call upon Dr. Bach’s Agrimony and Cerato remedies to support us in this quest.  Sagittarius, ruled by Jupiter…the planet that operates on faith, can easily become restless.  This is especially true when Sag is faced with its core mission, the quest to discover the meaning of life.  Ironically such an undertaking requires a ‘sense of peace’ in order for the archer to keep true to the mission.  Bach’s Agrimony is often paired astrologically with Sagittarius for many reasons.  In this instance, his own words describing Agrimony as the remedy that brings the peace that passeth  understanding,” leaves no doubt as to what is called for. 

Operating on intuition, the Moon doesn’t think and in Sagittarius, intuition and faith are mutually supportive.  We don’t need to understand.  Additionally, this lunar eclipse comes with other factors that intensify, for lack of a better word, this message.  Mercury, the planet of thinking (and ruler of Gemini) is in Gemini during this eclipse and conjuncts (sits next to!) Venus.  Shortly thereafter they’re both joined by…Jupiter.  Clearly the universe wants us to get the message that more information input does not guarantee knowledge.

As Agrimony is often paired with Sagittarius, Dr. Bach’s remedy Cerato is paired with Gemini.  Classically, the ‘Cerato negative state is described as manifesting in someone who’s very verbal, needing constant input from others or approval when in fact, they’re meant to trust their own ‘wisdom.’  With the message of this eclipse emphasizing heart and head working together, Cerato frankly helps us to shut up, go inside where we can work on learning this lesson!

 Finally, there’s one more small detail into this mix…Neptune, that nebulous planet of other-directed awareness.  With this lunar eclipse, Neptune is in a tight ‘T-Square’ to the Sagittarius Full Moon and Gemini Sun.  Squares are turning points…which way are we going to go?  Are we going to remain stagnant in the same patterns or are we willing to make changes offered to us for our evolutional growth?  Neptune in its square to the luminaries is just making certain we get its message: there’s more out there beyond the boundaries of our consciousness and the time is now to embrace it.  There’s no escaping, this will have been quite the month for progress along our evolutionary path!

 

Agrimony-300x295

DR. BACH’S AGRIMONY

Cerato

  AND CERATO

Photography©Dr. Edward Bach Foundation

 A personal note:  Coming Soon! My completely redesigned, reconstituted website~all visits welcomed-stay tuned for launch date.  

 You can follow me on:

http://www.facebook.com/gayemackauthor, http://www.gayemack.com, https://plus.google.com, http://www.twitter.com/gayemack or http://www.linkedin.com


AUTHOR NANCY BILYEAU REVEALS HOW DARTFORD PRIORY ESCAPED HENRY VIII’S RAMPAGE

Posted on by Gaye Mack in Ancient Legends of Great Britain, Worth the Read, Writer's Work 1 Comment

While I’m  drawn more to England’s 12th & 13th centuries, it’s nearly impossible to ignore King Henry VIII’s murderous assault on  his kingdom’s religious houses.  His rampage was so vile and its impact on the course of history so indelible, it boggles the mind to remember that Henry’s zeal was sparked by the love for a scheming woman and let’s be frank, his greed for the booty held in the monastic treasuries!  One particularly brutal example is found in my post detailing  the brutal murder of wealthy Glastonbury Abbey’s last abbot, Richard Whiting in 1539.  

However this said, admittedly I’ve never given much thought about what happened to the Tudor nunneries!  Were the women as brutally treated?  Fortunately , Nancy Bilyeau, historical fiction author of The Crown and  newly released sequel, The Chalice, has.  In a recent article,  Nancy discusses how she came to create her books with particular attention to the historical fate of  Dartford Priory, England’s only Dominican house which was located in the county of Kent.  Thus, I’m happy to welcome Nancy as my guest by posting a portion of her fascinating article which can be read in its entirety as it appears in the Catholic Herald

I chose the sole house of Dominican Sisters in England, Dartford Priory, as the home of my protagonist, the fictional Sister Joanna Stafford. A priory of “strict discipline and plain living,” it was founded with great care by Edward III in the 1350s. The women who took vows at Dartford were from the gentry or nobility. There was even one princess: Bridget of York, the youngest daughter of Edward IV. Daily life was spent praying, singing, studying, gardening, sewing and teaching local girls to read. Twice a week the Sisters distributed alms to the local poor. The prioresses were learned and formidable women. Elizabeth Cressner, who died in 1537, oversaw her house of nuns with tremendous vigor for 50 years.

When the king’s commissioners visited Dartford Priory they did not find a house in decay. In 1535, the Valor Ecclesiasticus put the net annual revenue of the monastery at a robust £380 9s ½d. The number of nuns had not declined over the last century, but held at a steady number. I have not been able to find any contemporary reports finding fault with Dartford.

Yet in 1539 Prioress Joan Vane “surrendered” the priory to the king and it was demolished. Why? Most likely because closure was inevitable – by that time almost every other abbey had been dissolved – and those who resisted faced royal savagery. Abbot Richard Whiting, 81, refused to surrender Glastonbury in 1539. He was arrested, imprisoned in the Tower of London, convicted of treason and dragged on a hurdle to the top of Glastonbury Tor. There, he was hanged, drawn and quartered, his severed head nailed to the gate of the deserted abbey. You can certainly see why most of the monastics submitted to the will of the king.

After the nuns of Dartford were evicted from their home, they received small pensions. Although the stereotype of a medieval nun is someone who is pressured to take vows, some of the Dominican Sisters continued to live together in groups because they did not want to abandon their vocations.

When Henry VIII’s oldest daughter, Mary, took the throne, she granted the Dominican nuns’ request to re-establish their order in Dartford and seven nuns moved back in. But this restoration only lasted as long as Mary lived. Elizabeth’s officials ordered the nuns to leave. They did so, joining some of the last remaining Sisters of Syon Abbey. Mary’s widower, King Philip, quietly paid for the group to leave England for the Netherlands. They went from convent to convent, suffering poverty and ill health. In Paul Lee’s book, Nunneries, Learning and Spirituality in Late Medieval English Society, a letter from someone who saw the Dartford nuns in 1561 in a convent on the island of Zeeland says: “These are the most elderly of all the religious and the most infirm, and it seems that they are more than half dead.” But they hung on for quite a bit longer. The last of the Dartford nuns died in Bruges in 1585.

st. michaels

St. Michael’s Tower where Glastonbury’s last abbot, Richard Whiting, was murdered by Henry VIII’s Men  in 1539

Photography©Gaye F. Mack

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ARCHAEOLOGISTS REVEAL RICHARD III’S BRUTAL DEATH

Posted on by Gaye Mack in Ancient Legends of Great Britain, Gaye's England, Scotland & Wales, Writer's Work Leave a comment

While final DNA testing on a skeleton believed to be England’s maligned king, Richard III is concluded, speculation as to how this king met his brutal death paints a grisly picture.  In a recent interview with the BBC, Dr Jo Appleby, an osteo-archaeologist from  Leicester University’s School of Archaeology and Ancient History, states that the skeleton had suffered ten  injuries, including eight to the skull, at around the time of death. Two of the skull wounds were potentially fatal.

According to Appleby, one wound was a “slice” removing a flap of bone, the other was caused by bladed weapon which went through and hit the opposite side of the skull – a depth of more than 10cm (4ins).  “Both of these injuries would have caused an almost instant loss of consciousness and death would have followed quickly afterwards.   In the case of the larger wound, if the blade had penetrated 7cm into the brain, which we cannot determine from the bones, death would have been instantaneous.”

Other wounds included slashes or stabs to the face and the side of the head. There was also evidence of “humiliation” injuries, including a pelvic wound likely to have been caused by an upward thrust of a weapon, through the buttock.

Dr Appleby added,  “The analysis of the skeleton proved that it was an adult male but was an unusually slender, almost feminine, build for a man.  Taken as a whole, the skeletal evidence provides a highly convincing case for identification as Richard III.”

Richard was killed at Bosworth in 1485 after only two years on the throne when challenged by Henry Tudor who became England’s King Henry VII.  Evidently the defeated monarch was given a rushed and clumsy burial beneath the church of Greyfriars in the center of Leicester. Excavation of the site has revealed no evidence of a coffin or shroud which would have left the bones in a more compact position than they were found.  Additionally, the arms of the skeleton were crossed which archaeologists believe could be an indication that the body was buried with the wrists still tied.

While initial DNA testing indicates that the  remains are  Richard’s, the drama isn’t over yet. In an interview with NBC news,Turi King, Leicester University geneticist who conducted the initial testing stated that mitochondrial DNA is not as precise an indicator as a paternity test. However, she also noted regarding the DNA found,  “It’s quite a rare type, so that adds to the weight of the evidence,” further adding that the mitochondrial DNA signature found with the skeleton is shared by only a few percent of Europeans.

The next step will be to analyze the skeleton’s Y-chromosome DNA and the more complicated reconstruction of the skeleton’s Y-chromosome DNA signature which is passed down from father to son.  Amazingly, four paternal-line descendants of Richard III’s family have already been identified and tested, awaiting further analysis.

black prince

KING RICHARD III OF ENGLAND

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PAIRING SCORPIO’S LUNAR ECLIPSE WITH DR. BACH’S ASPEN & WALNUT FOR MANAGING FEARS OF THE UNKNOWN AMIDST CHANGE & TRANSFORMATION

Posted on by Gaye Mack in Balance, Karmic and Self-Discovery Astrology, Writer's Work Leave a comment

 Originally I’d planned that my small hiatus from blogging would go until the end of April!  However, try as I might, I can’t ignore the importance of this eclipseWhile New and Full Moons always signify  beginnings and completions in some fashion, eclipsespower-boost’ these energies . The Scorpio  Full Moon  on April 25th illuminates energetic patterns and behaviors  holding us back from growing in our evolution.  As such, these elements  need to go.  There’s a building intensity  globally, locally and personally, to dissolve that which is outmoded in spite of the fiercest of resistances as new energetic patterns and behaviors push hard for incorporation into our internal databanks, waiting to be actioned. With the full moon opposing the Sun in Taurus, we’re reminded to nurture a fundamental relationship to our physical world, its beauty and what we most value.

When Dr. Edward Bach discovered the final 19 flower remedies to complete his famous 38 Bach remedies, Aspen and Walnut were among them.  He identified this group as I’ve written previously, as possessing a ‘higher spirituality’ functioning at a higher vibration than those remedies already discovered.

Among the  key characteristics of Aspen is that it allays our fears of going into unknown territory.  So often we are seduced in the belief, “better the devil you know than the one you don’t.”  However, as I’ve also written previously, the devil we know can take us right down the road of self-destruction, whether it be the result of a bad relationship, job or other life choices.  Aspen provides us the courage and faith needed to venture into uncharted waters, while Bach’s remedy, Walnut  is the remedy to help us make changes that we need to make.

Classically this remedy helps us to, in the words of the well-known author Dr. Leo Buscaglia, “ cut the toxic ties that bind.”  It helps us to get our foot over the threshold, to let go of those things, patterns and behaviors that no longer serve us well.   All of these considerations are a tall order, as our egos never want to ‘let go.’  This said, there’s a caveat in mind/body/spirit philosophy… “that which you resist the most, is that which you need to let go of.”  Before you’re brought to your knees in resistance, reach for Dr. Bach’s Aspen and Walnut…it bears repeating, you’ll feel better in the morning!

aspen

DR. BACH’S ASPEN

walnut

 DR. BACH’S WALNUT

Photography©Dr. Edward Bach Foundation

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